Sam's Panama Canal Cruise & Tour with Caravan.comSam's Toybox Homepage

My first international travel since retirement, I took an eight day bus/boat tour & cruise of Panama and the Panama Canal with Caravan.com. Had a great time and here are 300+ photos to prove it.

Click on any thumbnail to take you to a larger picture with caption. Each picture has next/previous links to take you through the entire tour. Cheers, Sam


Day One - Fri 2/26/16 - Fly from Albuquerque to Houston to Panama City, Transfer to Marriot Hotel


Day Two - Sat 2/27/16 - Tour of Old Panama City, Miraflores Locks Visitor Center, Entertainment at our hotel

Our bus, driven by Mr. Pinilla was comfortable. 2/27/2016 First stop was a museum in Old Panama. This is a 3D map of what the city once looked like. 2/27/2016 Low tide on the Pacific Ocean. Looking at the Causeway Bridge. 2/27/2016 There are multiple skylines of Panama City. 2/27/2016 Various ruins of the city have been stabilized using modern brick & masonary. 2/27/2016 The ruins stand quite near modern skyscrapers. 2/27/2016 There is a two story marketplace where one can buy all kinds of home made local crafts. 2/27/2016 The water really goes out at low tide. 2/27/2016 Lots of the stones in Old Panama were taken to its new site eight miles away. 2/27/2016 Lots of modern reinforcement is needed to keep the remaining walls from toppling. 2/27/2016 Lots of modern reinforcement is needed to keep the remaining walls from toppling. 2/27/2016 Wish I could remember the name of these trees with triangular bases. 2/27/2016 The Bell Tower from the original Cathedral is mostly intact. 2/27/2016 Three stories up, it has a modern staircase one can climb to see the views out of these windows. 2/27/2016 Part of the circular staircase has been recreated for display purposes only. 2/27/2016 View through the window of the second floor of the tower. 2/27/2016 A great view of the Panama City skyline from the top of the tower. 2/27/2016 I made the three flights of stairs without suffering cardiac arrest! 2/27/2016 A close up view of the spiral staircase from above. 2/27/2016 Our guide Gerardo flanked by two other Caravan employees who joined us for some of the tours. 2/27/2016 Some nice intact ruins. 2/27/2016 The old with the new, you can see modern skyscrapers through the ancient window openings. 2/27/2016 This is a huge Banyon tree (I believe). 2/27/2016 While driving to the newer Panama City we passed the fisherman's area of town where the boats simply sit on the mud at low tide. 2/27/2016 I've never seen this low tide situation and had no idea! 2/27/2016 Panama City has a great mix of architectures from new modern buildings to horrible crumbling slums. 2/27/2016 Our guide said that 80% of the high rise buildings in Panama City are residential, not office buildings. 2/27/2016 More modern skyscrapers. 2/27/2016 Some buildings have very interesting shapes and styles. 2/27/2016 Open air markets dot the older, poorer sections of town. 2/27/2016 Most patios are covered with wrought iron as crime is rampant. 2/27/2016 Older interesting buildings abound. 2/27/2016 Original facades of the buildings have been preserved and restored. 2/27/2016 Plazas with statues are beautifully done. 2/27/2016 Many parts of the city are yet to be redone. 2/27/2016 Iglesia de San Jose Church was moved from Old Panama to its new location downtown after pirates attacked the city. 2/27/2016 Pirates did not steal this gold plated alter as it was painted black before they arrived. 2/27/2016 The priest not only saved the alter but convinced the pirates to leave a donation as the church was so poor. 2/27/2016 Beautiful interior of the church. 2/27/2016 Beautiful interior of the church. 2/27/2016 Beautiful interior of the church. 2/27/2016 Beautiful interior of the church. 2/27/2016 The Acueducto of Panama - how cool is that? 2/27/2016 The last remaining piece of the original wall that surrounded the city. Behind is a building that has been half renovated. 2/27/2016 Interesting triangular shaped building/residence. 2/27/2016 Cool old Nissan pickup. 2/27/2016 Like a Hollywood movie set, sometimes only the front of the buildings are maintained. 2/27/2016 Driving to the Miraflores Visitors Center, we see the fierce winds near the ocean. 2/27/2016 Clouds roll in most afternoons and we had just a touch of rain today. 2/27/2016 The city buses used in some parts of Panama are former school buses from the US and Canada, all decorated to entice riders. 2/27/2016

On the first floor of the Visitors Center is a model of one of the dredges used to build the canal. 2/27/2016 First view of the Miraflores Locks looking southeast toward the Pacific Ocean. 2/27/2016 Here is an artists rendering. Visitor center is near the tip of the red arrow. 2/27/2016 Nice view of the pair of locks nearest the Pacific Ocean. Both are in various states of filling. 2/27/2016 The bridge at the top right is half of a swinging draw bridge used at one time for traffic to cross the Canal. 2/27/2016 Two ships preparing to enter the northmost Miraflores locks. 2/27/2016 Three small ships already present in the locks including the large passenger ship we will ride on our transit (the other direction) in two days. 2/27/2016 The gray ship is a grain carrier and will transit with the smaller ships. The orange ship is a car carrier and will transit in a lock by itself. 2/27/2016 Nice view of the lock doors holding back the water 54 feet above the Pacific. 2/27/2016 The grain ship is being guided into the locks with six <i>Mule</i> locomotives to keep it centered. 2/27/2016 You can see the water level of the far lock is lowering to take the four ships 27 feet closer to sea level. 2/27/2016 The car carrier is being pulled into its lock with the mules while the far lock continues to drain. 2/27/2016 The Catamaran has disappeared behind the wall of the far lock. 2/27/2016 Now the Cabin Cruiser has all but disappeared while the near lock has not yet started draining. 2/27/2016 The far lock doors are just starting to open while the near lock has started draining to lower the car carrier. 2/27/2016 It is about 15 minutes later and the ships are in the second set of locks almost at sea level. 2/27/2016 Here is a nice shot of one of the mule locomatives. 2/27/2016 The near lock is again filling for another southbound ship to enter it. 2/27/2016 Nice view of the building between the locks at Miraflores. 2/27/2016 Yet another of the cool city buses with its elaborate paint job and domed roof. 2/27/2016

We were treated to a display of local dance before dinner on our first full day of touring. 2/27/2016 We were treated to a display of local dance before dinner on our first full day of touring. 2/27/2016 We were treated to a display of local dance before dinner on our first full day of touring. 2/27/2016 We were treated to a display of local dance before dinner on our first full day of touring. 2/27/2016 We were treated to a display of local dance before dinner on our first full day of touring. 2/27/2016 We were treated to a display of local dance before dinner on our first full day of touring. 2/27/2016 We were treated to a display of local dance before dinner on our first full day of touring. 2/27/2016 We were treated to a display of local dance before dinner on our first full day of touring. 2/27/2016 I even got to join in on the dancing. 2/27/2016


Day Three - Sun 2/28/16 - Colon City, Canal Expansion Project at Gatun, Boat tour of Gatun Lake to Monkey Island

On the second full tour day we drove across Panama to Colon City on the Atlantic side. Here is a sight from a restroom break on the drive. 2/28/2016 We also passed an old fashion circus on the way. 2/28/2016 Saw this nice monument on our driving tour of Colon City. 2/28/2016 I love these city buses and wish we would have had a chance to get closer to them. 2/28/2016 Yet more buses and a look at some of the cranes used to unload Post-Panamex sized ships. 2/28/2016 Colon City is quite a bit more run down than Panama City. 2/28/2016 Colon City is quite a bit more run down than Panama City. 2/28/2016 Colon City is quite a bit more run down than Panama City. 2/28/2016 Colon City is quite a bit more run down than Panama City. 2/28/2016 I love this motorcycle cart. 2/28/2016 Ships are backed up on both ends of the Canal including these on the Atlantic/Caribbean side. 2/28/2016 Ships are backed up on both ends of the Canal including these on the Atlantic/Caribbean side. 2/28/2016 Ships that will not fit through the Canal (Post Panamex size) are often unloaded on one side and their cargo shipped by train across Panama. 2/28/2016 The cranes on both sides of the canal are impressive. 2/28/2016 One cemetary where some of the folks who gave their lives building the Canal are buried. 2/28/2016 Panamex sized container ships, which this is not, can carry up to 4500 containers through the Canal. 2/28/2016 Lots of ships waiting in Gatun Lake to go through the locks to the Atlantic/Caribbean. 2/28/2016 First look at the third set of locks on the Gatun side. You can see the holding ponds to recycle water for these locks. 2/28/2016 Artist rendering of the new locks at Gatun. Visitor center is at the far right below the word 'Third' in 'Third set of locks'. 2/28/2016 A good look at the new rolling doors which will be more efficient and can be used as vehicle bridges if necessary. 2/28/2016 Proof that I was actually there and these pics aren't ones I picked up on the web! 2/28/2016 Proof that I was actually there and these pics aren't ones I picked up on the web! 2/28/2016 Once ready to open, the land bridge on the left will be removed via a floating dredge so the lock can be put into service. 2/28/2016 The retaining ponds behind this first set of locks have not yet been filled for leak test. 2/28/2016 Work started on the new locks in 2007 and they are slated to open in 2017 or 2018 (not 2011 as originally stated). 2/28/2016 Artist rendering of the new locks including size. Max size of ship old locks: 965 x 106 feet. Max for new locks: 1200 x 160 feet. 2/28/2016 During lunch at the Expansion Project Visitor Center we were again treated to some local dances. 2/28/2016 During lunch at the Expansion Project Visitor Center we were again treated to some local dances. 2/28/2016 During lunch at the Expansion Project Visitor Center we were again treated to some local dances. 2/28/2016 During lunch at the Expansion Project Visitor Center we were again treated to some local dances. 2/28/2016 During lunch at the Expansion Project Visitor Center we were again treated to some local dances. 2/28/2016 During lunch at the Expansion Project Visitor Center we were again treated to some local dances. 2/28/2016 King for a Day! 2/28/2016 Lunch items straight out of a James Bond Movie! 2/28/2016 Last look at the expansion project. 2/28/2016 Last look at the expansion project. 2/28/2016 A container ship heading to the existing Gatun Locks and on to the Atlantic Ocean. 2/28/2016 And a final view of the many ships waiting their turn in the Gatun Locks. 2/28/2016 And a final view of the many ships waiting their turn in the Gatun Locks. 2/28/2016

While driving to our Gatun Lake Cruise, we were right by the lake. 2/28/2016 Dredging goes on full time as rocks from the sides of the cut try to fill in the Canal. 2/28/2016 On board one of our two boats for a cruise on Gatun Lake. We're on the Chagris River which feeds the lake. 2/28/2016 First view of the Gamboa Rainforest Resort where we will stay for two nights. 2/28/2016 The bridge ahead is a single lane vehicle, railroad, and pedestrian bridge. It is a bit dicey being 100 years old. 2/28/2016 Wacky lighthouse on the Chagris River. Chagris means Crocodile though we didn't see any yet. 2/28/2016 The Titan Crane is one of the largest floating cranes in the world. Built for Hitler in 1941, its been at the Canal since 1996. 2/28/2016 There's our other boat, apparently in a hurry. 2/28/2016 We passed a number of large ships on our lake cruise. 2/28/2016 We passed a number of large ships on our lake cruise. 2/28/2016 Another Lighthouse and lots of electical lines that run by the train tracks. 2/28/2016 Lots of places that needed opened up when the Canal was built were done in stairstep fashion. 2/28/2016 This is a tugboat dock in the middle of the lake. 2/28/2016 We were told that 30-40 ships make it through the canal on a given day. We saw so many in so few hours that I think that number is a bit low. 2/28/2016 Our sister boat slowly approaches Monkey Island. Hope the monkeys are home today. 2/28/2016 The monkeys were ready for us. These are Capuchin monkeys and they were happy to interact with us. 2/28/2016 Thankfully I had purchased a camera with optical zoom to get some good close-ups. 2/28/2016 Thankfully I had purchased a camera with optical zoom to get some good close-ups. 2/28/2016 Our guides lured some of the monkeys onto our boats with some grapes. 2/28/2016 Including this mom and baby. 2/28/2016 This monkey just chased a lizard off this rock before I could photograph them together. 2/28/2016 He settled for a snack instead of the lizard. 2/28/2016 The monkeys walked across the boat canopies to get to their treats. 2/28/2016 These monkeys, whose type I can't remember, were much smaller than the Capuchins. 2/28/2016 They were harder to capture in the trees as they were small and fast moving. 2/28/2016 Some nice birds present near the island as well, though I can't name this one. 2/28/2016 Another large ship. 2/28/2016 And another dredge. 2/28/2016 We passed the large container ship on our way back to the Chagris River dock. 2/28/2016 We passed the large container ship on our way back to the Chagris River dock. 2/28/2016 There is the container ship eating our wake. 2/28/2016 Back at the dock we ran into some buzzards. 2/28/2016 Back at the dock we ran into some buzzards. 2/28/2016 I don't remember what this animal was that we saw on our drive to the Rainforest Resort. 2/28/2016


Day Four - Mon 2/29/16 - Partial Transit of the Panama Canal, drive to Gamboa Rainforest Resort

We started the third day driving to the Pacific to take our ride through the canal. This is a look at some of the ships waiting to enter the Miraflores locks. 2/29/2016 On our ship, we all made it to the third floor for a good view of our transit. 2/29/2016 This was our guide for the transit JC. He is standing near the souvenir stand where many t-shirts and other tchotchkes flew off the shelf. 2/29/2016 Many private craft are docked near our marina. 2/29/2016 Largest floating dredge in use I believe. 2/29/2016 This is the Westin Playa Bonita Resort where we would spend two nights. All inclusive, I even drank a bit (since it was free!). 2/29/2016 The larger tower is apartments and the smaller is the hotel where we stayed. Very nicely done. 2/29/2016 All ships that go through the canal relinquish control to a Panama Canal Pilot. Ours came on this boat to board us. 2/29/2016 This large grain carrier that passed us was just the right size to accompany us through the locks. 2/29/2016 A nice view of the Panama City skyline from our ship. 2/29/2016 The grain carrier is heading toward the Bridge of the Americas. 2/29/2016 Large suction dredge used to keep the canal deep enough. 2/29/2016 The Bridge of the Americas actually does bridge North and South America. 2/29/2016 The Bridge of the Americas actually does bridge North and South America. 2/29/2016 One of the hard working Canal tugboats. 2/29/2016 Nice view of the bridge as we passed under it. 2/29/2016 Nice view of the bridge as we passed under it. 2/29/2016 The cranes used to move containers off of large ships. 2/29/2016 The cranes used to move containers off of large ships. 2/29/2016 Not sure if these are military ships or not. 2/29/2016 Cranes working on a container ship. 2/29/2016 This ship is way too big to fit through the locks. 2/29/2016 First look at the doors to the new, bigger locks at Miraflores. 2/29/2016 These locks likely won't open until 2017, perhaps later. 2/29/2016 Tugboats guide the grain carrier toward the eastern set of locks at Miraflores. 2/29/2016 A look back at the Bridge of the Americas as we wait to enter the locks. 2/29/2016 A look back at the cranes as we wait to enter the locks. 2/29/2016 We'll accompany the green ship on the right, the catamaran and sailboat will join the white carrier on the left. 2/29/2016 The tugboats hold the ships steady as the mule engines are hooked up. 2/29/2016 Close-up of our lock mate. 2/29/2016 The swinging draw bridge used to be the only way to cross the canal until the Bridge of the Americas was built in 1962. 2/29/2016 View of one of the mules hooked up to the grain carrier. 2/29/2016 We prepare to join the grain carrier in the lock. 2/29/2016 Close-up of the lock interior. 2/29/2016 The first set of gates start to close behind us. 2/29/2016 These gates are 72 feet tall, six feet thick and are hollow so they float. 2/29/2016 We're actually tied off to the tugboat and not to the lock walls. 2/29/2016 Doors closed nearly five minutes before and our lock has been flooded to raise us up 27 feet. 2/29/2016 The western locks got a head start and are nearly full to the top. 2/29/2016 Our lock is full and we are moving forward into the next lock. 2/29/2016 Nice view of the cog railway that the mules run on. 2/29/2016 The building between the locks at Miraflores. 2/29/2016 View of the double lock doors between the two Miraflores locks. 2/29/2016 A view back at the visitors center where we stood two days ago watching other ships on the locks. 2/29/2016 The lock doors have collapsing guard rails that raise into position so workers can walk across them. 2/29/2016 We've cleared the doors so they can start closing. 2/29/2016 The double doors are just starting to close. 2/29/2016 Two sets of doors are needed in case a ship ran into one--the entire lake could drain in no time! 2/29/2016 About eight minutes later, our lock has been flooded and we're now 54 feet above the Pacific. 2/29/2016 Skip ahead a mile or so across Miraflores Lake and we're in the Pedro Miguel lock with the smaller boats. 2/29/2016 Close-up of the side of the lock. 2/29/2016 We're tied up directly to the lock wall as there is no tugboat with us this time. 2/29/2016 The doors in front of us open as we continue on to Gatun Lake. 56 million gallons of water are released from the lake to the oceans for a full transit. 2/29/2016 Four mule locomotives as we leave the locks. 2/29/2016 This is the Centenial Bridge, named to commemorate 100 years since Panama was liberated from Columbia. 2/29/2016 We enter the Culebra Cut, the narrowest part of the Canal where large ships going in different directions do so one at a time. 2/29/2016 Large container ship heading toward the Pacific as we head toward the Atlantic. 2/29/2016 Just past the Titan crane is the end of our partial Canal transit. Very well done. 2/29/2016


Day Five - Tue 3/1/16 - Boat ride to Embera Indian Village, Orchid/Butterfly/Frog Habitats, to Beachfront Resort

Our hotel, the Gamboa Rainforest Resort is right on the Chagris River. I walked down to see the crocodiles and they were MIA. 2/29/2016 A view of the Gamboa Rainforest Resort as we take the small boats on the Chagris River to the Embera Indian Village. 3/1/2016 A view of the Gamboa Rainforest Resort as we take the small boats on the Chagris River to the Embera Indian Village. 3/1/2016 A view of the Gamboa Rainforest Resort as we take the small boats on the Chagris River to the Embera Indian Village. 3/1/2016 A view of the Gamboa Rainforest Resort as we take the small boats on the Chagris River to the Embera Indian Village. 3/1/2016 Climbing the hill to the village while being greated by its residents. 3/1/2016 Being serenaded by the village musicians. 3/1/2016 We gather in the large shelter hut to hear about the Embera way of life and see their handicrafts. 3/1/2016 The ladies of the tribe showed us some local dances. 3/1/2016 The ladies of the tribe showed us some local dances. 3/1/2016 The ladies of the tribe showed us some local dances. 3/1/2016 The musicians did a nice job. 3/1/2016 More dancing. 3/1/2016 And more music. 3/1/2016 All ages got into the dance, as did some of us dragged from the admiring audience. 3/1/2016 One of the dozen or so huts in the village. 3/1/2016 Locals use a plant-based black ink to give each other temporary tattoos. 3/1/2016 The colorful skirts are imported. 3/1/2016 Zoomed view of the Rainforest Resort from the Embera Village. 3/1/2016 We say goodbye to our hosts after a nice visit. 3/1/2016

I finally got to wrestle a crocodile to work up an appetite before lunch. 3/1/2016 The Rainforest Resort had an Orchid, Butterfly, and Frog Habitat exhibit that we visited. 3/1/2016 Dancing Lady Orchids. 3/1/2016 Dancing Lady Orchids. 3/1/2016 Our tour guide discusses the hundreds of types of Orchids growing here. 3/1/2016 Beautiful Orchid example. 3/1/2016 Beautiful Orchid example. 3/1/2016 Beautiful Orchid example. 3/1/2016 Pineapple is in the Orchid family. Who knew? 3/1/2016 The Spider Orchid. 3/1/2016 The Black Orchid. 3/1/2016 Beautiful Orchid example. 3/1/2016 Beautiful Orchid example. 3/1/2016 We enter the butterfly exhibit. 3/1/2016 Butterflies are hard to photograph as they rarely sit still. 3/1/2016 This is the only shot I have of the blue butterfly even partially opened. 3/1/2016 Mostly the blue butterfly sits closed up and hiding the beautiful blue on the upper side of its wings. 3/1/2016 Not sure what the upper side of this butterfly's wings look like as he wouldn't open up. 3/1/2016 This is the second time one of the butterflies used my hat as a resting place. 3/1/2016 Managed to get a photo when another visitor carefully removed my hat for me. 3/1/2016 A pair of butterflies resting on the mesh fence. 3/1/2016 Finally, some of the butterflies held still for me! 3/1/2016 In the frog exhibit the colorful frogs were tiny, an inch or less. 3/1/2016 Different types of green frogs were present and fairly easy to spot. 3/1/2016 The red frogs were even smaller and there were fewer of them in the exhibit. 3/1/2016 The yellow frogs were bigger than the red, smaller than the green ones. This is the only yellow one I saw. 3/1/2016 Another rare red frog was the last shot I took before we left the exhibit. 3/1/2016 Before we left the Rainforest Resort we spotted this iguana hanging out in a tree. 3/1/2016

As we drove to our next hotel, the Westin Playa Bonita Resort, we crossed the Centenial Bridge. 3/1/2016 Very interesting bridge that was built from both sides at once so that it did not interfere with Canal traffic. 3/1/2016 Nice view of the suspension. 3/1/2016


Day Six - Wed 3/2/16 - Free day at the Westin Playa Bonita Resort

The Westin Playa Bonita Resort as seen from its private beach. 3/2/2016 View out the windows of a private club on the 19th floor. We stayed on the other side of the hotel facing away from the ocean. 3/2/2016 View from the 19th floor windows. I drank five frozen strawberry margaritas sitting by these pools. 3/2/2016 View from the 19th floor windows. At any time there are dozens of ships waiting to enter the canal. 3/2/2016 View from the 19th floor windows, including the swim-up bar. 3/2/2016 People exploring the shoreline at low tide. At high tide, the bouy line is the far limit of the swimming area. 3/2/2016 View of the swimming area (and one of the pool bars) from the first floor lobby windows. 3/2/2016 View of the swimming area from the first floor lobby windows. 3/2/2016


Day Seven - Wed 3/3/16 - Souvenir shopping, Museum of Biodiversity, Good-bye show & dinner at Intercontinental Miramar

Our last view of the Bridge of the Americas as we drive on our final day of sightseeing. 3/3/2016 We arrived at the Museum of Bio Diversity designed by Frank Gehry. 3/3/2016 Lots of weary travelers mount the stairs of the Museum. 3/3/2016 A view of the Panama City skyline from the Museum. 3/3/2016 Looking up at the underside of the roof structure. 3/3/2016 The entrance to the museum has a nice setup with laser etched animal portraits in beautiful plywood. 3/3/2016 Nice poster showing some of the local fauna. 3/3/2016 View of the animal sculpture garden from the second floor. 3/3/2016 The Museum contains a great theater with 10 screens including two in the floor that you stand on. 3/3/2016 The show was overwhelming. 3/3/2016 The show was overwhelming. 3/3/2016 The show was overwhelming. 3/3/2016 The show was overwhelming. 3/3/2016 Megalodon tooth, as well as some smaller shark teeth. 3/3/2016 Skull and claw of a Giant Sloth (I believe). 3/3/2016 Skulls of ancient Armadillo and Large Bird. 3/3/2016 Sabre Toothed cat skull. 3/3/2016 The animal sculpture garden on the ground floor of the Museum. 3/3/2016 The animal sculpture garden on the ground floor of the Museum. 3/3/2016 The animal sculpture garden on the ground floor of the Museum. 3/3/2016 The animal sculpture garden on the ground floor of the Museum. 3/3/2016 More Megalodon teeth. 3/3/2016 And the jaw of a Megalodon. 3/3/2016

View from my ninth floor room at the Intercontinental Miramar Hotel in downtown Panama City. Low tide on the Pacific ocean. 3/3/2016 View of the skyline from my window. 3/3/2016 Been seeing this oil rig on most of the trip and this is my first chance to photograph it. 3/3/2016 Low tide in the marina where the boats simply sit on the ground until the water returns. 3/3/2016 The hotel's second floor bar/nightclub is prepping for an event. 3/3/2016 I did like the view. 3/3/2016 And the view straight down. 3/3/2016

Prior to our final dinner (all you could eat Prime Rib buffet!) we had more local entertainment. 3/3/2016 We saw a mix of dances including this peasant dance. 3/3/2016 We saw a mix of dances including this peasant dance. 3/3/2016 We saw a mix of dances including this peasant dance. 3/3/2016 The Devil Dance was done by Catholic Missionaries to scare locals into converting. 3/3/2016 The Devil Dance was done by Catholic Missionaries to scare locals into converting. 3/3/2016 The Devil Dance was done by Catholic Missionaries to scare locals into converting. 3/3/2016 We learned about the formal dresses used for special occassions. 3/3/2016 We learned about the formal dresses used for special occassions. 3/3/2016 The dresses are handmade and with all their accoutrements can be worth over $20,000 each. 3/3/2016 The men's formal wear is a bit more modest. 3/3/2016 The bag is for seeds to plant and this wide-brimmed hat is an actual Panama Hat, unlike the one that Roosevelt wore in the early 1900s. 3/3/2016 The entertainment was fabulous. 3/3/2016 The entertainment was fabulous. 3/3/2016 The entertainment was fabulous. 3/3/2016 The entertainment was fabulous. 3/3/2016 The entertainment was fabulous. 3/3/2016 I got to pose with the dancers. 3/3/2016 The end of an entertaining show. 3/3/2016 Close-up of one of the Devil Dance masks. 3/3/2016 And of the other. 3/3/2016 Panama City at night from my hotel room. 3/3/2016 The bar/nightclub from above. 3/3/2016 Panama City at night from my hotel room. 3/3/2016


Day Eight and Home - Thu 3/4/16 - Transfer to airport, fly home though Houston, Souvenirs I brought home with me

Last look at the spiral building on my way to the airport. 3/4/2016 Panama City as I fly toward the states. 3/4/2016 Homemade souvenirs: Capuchin Monkeys carved out of a nut by the Embera Indians, Headband by Kuna Indians. All the souvenirs I have to remember this awesome trip.


All in all a very successful and enjoyable trip. This was my first Caravan.com tour but probably not my last. Sam



Other photo galleries
Alaskan Inside Passage Cruise (2017) | China via Los Angeles (2017) | Iceland via Denver (2017) | New England Fall Foliage Tour (2016) | Mexican Riviera Cruise (2016) | Panama Canal Trip (2016) | Trip to the Rose Parade (2015-2016) | East Coast Rollercoaster Extravaganza (2013) | Sam & Peter's Europe Trip (2008)
 

Contact me: Sam Cancilla, sam@samstoybox.com.

Last Modified: March 18, 2016

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